Research

Access to and utilisation of healthcare services by sex workers at truck-stop clinics in South Africa: A case study

S C Fobosi, S T Lalla-Edward, S Ncube, F Buthelezi, P Matthew, A Kadyakapita, M Slabbert, C A Hankins, W D F Venter, G B Gomez

Abstract


Background. Sex worker-specific health services aim to respond to the challenges that this key population faces in accessing healthcare. These services aim to integrate primary healthcare (PHC) interventions, yet most services tend to focus on prevention of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). North Star Alliance (North Star) is a public-private partnership providing a healthcare service package in roadside wellness clinics (RWCs) to at-risk populations along transport corridors in sub-Saharan Africa.

Objectives. To inform future service development for sex workers and describe North Star’s contribution to healthcare provision to this population in South Africa, we describe services provided to and utilised by sex workers, and their views of these services.

Methods. Using a mixed-methods approach, we present quantitative analyses of anonymised North Star routine data for sex workers for October 2013 - September 2015, covering nine sites in seven provinces. Clinic visits were disaggregated by type of service accessed. We performed thematic analysis of 25 semi-structured interviews conducted at five clinics.

Results. A total of 2 794 sex workers accessed RWCs during the 2 years. Sex workers attending clinics were almost exclusively female (98.2%) and aged <40 years (83.8%). The majority were South African (83.8%), except at Musina, where the majority of clients were Zimbabwean. On average, sex workers visited the clinics 1.5 times per person. However, in most cases only one service was accessed per visit. PHC services other than for HIV and STIs were accessed more commonly than HIV-specific services and STI treatment. There was an increase in the number of services accessed over time, the figure almost doubling from 1 489 during the first year to 2 936 during the second year. Although during recruitment participants reported having had sex in exchange for goods or money during the past 3 months, not all participants self-identified as sex workers during interviews; however, all reported feeling at higher risk of poor health than the general population owing to their involvement in sex work. Participants reported satisfaction with site accessibility, location and operating hours. Sex workers accessing sites described services as being suitable and accessible, with friendly staff.

Conclusions. RWCs were highly appreciated by the users, as they are suitable and accessible. The sex workers who used the clinics visited them irregularly, mostly for PHC services other than HIV and STIs. Services other than the one for which the sex worker came to the clinic rarely appeared to be offered. We recommend areas for service expansion.

 


Authors' affiliations

S C Fobosi, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

S T Lalla-Edward, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

S Ncube, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

F Buthelezi, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

P Matthew, North Star Alliance, Durban, South Africa

A Kadyakapita, North Star Alliance, Durban, South Africa

M Slabbert, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

C A Hankins, Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

W D F Venter, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

G B Gomez, Department of Global Health and Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

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Keywords

Key populations; Sex worker; Healthcare access; Programme evaluation; HIV

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2017;107(11):994-999. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2017.v107i11.12379

Article History

Date submitted: 2017-10-31
Date published: 2017-10-31

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