In Practice

Emergence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus at a tertiary paediatric hospital in South Africa

Harsha Lochan, Clinton Moodley, Diane Rip, Colleen Bamford, Marc Hendricks, Alan Davidson, Brian Eley

Abstract


Background. During 2013, the haematology/oncology unit at a tertiary level paediatric hospital in South Africa experienced the emergence of infection with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE).Objective. To describe the clinical and molecular aspects of the cases identified.Methods. VRE isolates identified from blood culture specimens processed at the National Health Laboratory Service were screened for the presence of the vancomycin resistance genes vanA, B and C1, 2 and 3. Further characterisation of these isolates was carried out using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PGFE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Clinical records of infected patients were reviewed to identify possible risk factors, while surveillance with rectal swabs was performed to identify VRE-colonised patients.Results. Four patients with haematological malignancies were identified with VRE bloodstream infections. Patients were immunocompromised at the time of the bloodstream infection (BSI), with receipt of vancomycin prior to VRE-BSI, and infections were treated with linezolid. Colonisation with VRE was found in 8 of 55 patients screened. Infected and colonised patients were isolated in the unit during their admission and strict contact precaution infection control practices were instituted. The vanA gene was identified in all of the isolates but one. PFGE and MLST results showed a degree of genetic relatedness between certain isolates obtained from rectal swab and blood culture samples, suggesting possible patient-to-patient transmission or persistence of the isolates in the unit.Conclusion. Strict infection control practices are necessary to prevent infection and transmission of resistant organisms among vulnerable patients.

Authors' affiliations

Harsha Lochan, Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Clinton Moodley, Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa; National Health Laboratory Service, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

Diane Rip, Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa; National Health Laboratory Service, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

Colleen Bamford, Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa; National Health Laboratory Service, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

Marc Hendricks, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa; Haemotology/Oncology Service, Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

Alan Davidson, National Health Laboratory Service, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

Brian Eley, Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

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Keywords

Vancomycin-resistant; Enterococcus; VRE; Infection control

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2016;106(6):562-566. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2016.v106i6.10858

Article History

Date submitted: 2016-04-02
Date published: 2016-05-09

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