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Herbal medicine, randomised controlled trials and global core competencies

Nandi Louise Siegfried, Gail Hughes

Abstract


Despite widespread use, few empirical data on the efficacy of traditional medicine are available. We conducted systematic reviews of eight widely used African medicines and identified only one plant, Pelargonium sidoides, which has been extensively studied (including in a Cochrane systematic review). To address the need for rigorous science to underpin traditional medicine claims, the South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute at the University of Western Cape launched the Multi-disciplinary University Traditional Health Initiative (MUTHI) in 2011. The European Union-funded initiative aims to build sustainable research capacity on plants for better public health in Africa. A 2011 needs analysis of clinicians and scientists from 14 African countries confirmed a lack of clinical trial methodology, knowledge and experience. In response, MUTHI deliverables include annual clinical trial methodology workshops in host countries and development of e-learning modules. The initiative provides a unique opportunity for developing African capacity to discover new medicinal products.

Authors' affiliations

Nandi Louise Siegfried, South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town

Gail Hughes, South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town

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Keywords

clinical trials; herbal medicine; curriculum development

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2012;102(12):912-913. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.6392

Article History

Date submitted: 2012-10-10
Date published: 2012-10-25

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