Continuing Medical Education

Inherited bleeding disorders

N Alli, J Vaughan, S Louw, E Schapkaitz, J Mahlangu

Abstract


Abnormal bleeding is a common clinical presentation in general practice, and a rational approach to this problem is therefore required. Investigation of a suspected bleeding disorder necessitates a comprehensive history, thorough physical examination and systematic laboratory work-up. Inherited bleeding disorders (IBDs) typically manifest in childhood, but may present later in life after a haemostatic challenge (such as trauma, surgery, tooth extraction). This two-part CME series is intended to provide insight to the medical practitioner on the clinical spectrum, diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Bleeding due to inherited disorders is the subject of discussion in part 1 (current issue), and in part 2 (forthcoming issue) the focus is on bleeding from acquired causes. Patients diagnosed with an IBD should ideally be referred to a dedicated tertiary healthcare facility, e.g. haemophilia centre, for management and follow-up.


Authors' affiliations

N Alli, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

J Vaughan, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

S Louw, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

E Schapkaitz, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

J Mahlangu, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, School of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

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Keywords

Bleeding; Inherited

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2018;108(1):9-15. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2017.v108i1.13020

Article History

Date submitted: 2017-12-13
Date published: 2017-12-13

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