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Bacteria isolated from the airways of paediatric patients with bronchiectasis according to HIV status

Charl Verwey, Sithembiso Velaphi, Riaz Khan

Abstract


Background. Knowledge of which bacteria are found in the airways of paediatric patients with bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis (CF) is important in defining empirical antibiotic guidelines for the treatment of acute infective exacerbations.

Objective. To describe the bacteria isolated from the airways of children with non-CF bronchiectasis according to their HIV status.

Methods. Records of children with non-CF bronchiectasis who attended the paediatric pulmonology clinic at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa, from April 2011 to March 2013, or were admitted to the hospital during that period, were reviewed. Data collected included patient demographics, HIV status, and characteristics of the airway samples and types of bacteria isolated.

Results. There were 66 patients with non-CF bronchiectasis over the 2-year study period. The median age was 9.1 years (interquartile range 7.2 - 12.1). The majority of patients (78.8%) were HIV-infected. A total of 134 samples was collected (median 1.5 per patient, range 1 - 7), of which 81.3% were expectorated or induced sputum samples. Most bacteria were Gram negatives (72.1%). Haemophilus influenzae was the most common bacterium identified (36.0%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (12.6%), Moraxella catarrhalis (11.1%) and Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%). There were no differences between HIV-infected and uninfected patients in prevalence or type of pathogens isolated.

Conclusion. Bacterial isolates from the airways of children with non-CF bronchiectasis were similar to those in other paediatric populations and were not affected by HIV status.


Authors' affiliations

Charl Verwey, Department of Paediatrics, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Sithembiso Velaphi, Department of Paediatrics, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Riaz Khan, Department of Paediatrics, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

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Keywords

Bronchiectasis; HIV; HIV-associated lung disease; Non-infectious lung disease; Chronic suppurative lung disease

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2017;107(5):435-439. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2017.v107i5.10692

Article History

Date submitted: 2017-04-25
Date published: 2017-04-25

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