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The microbiome in chronic inflammatory airway disease: A threatened species

Robin John Green, Andre van Niekerk, Ashley C Jeevarathnum, Charles Feldman, Guy A Richards, on behalf of the South African Allergic Rhinitis Working Group

Abstract


The human body is exposed to a multitude of microbes and infectious organisms throughout life. Many of these organisms colonise the skin, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and airway. We now recognise that this colonisation includes the lower airway, previously thought to be sterile. These colonising organisms play an important role in disease prevention, including an array of chronic inflammatory conditions that are unrelated to infectious diseases. However, new evidence of immune dysregulation suggests that early colonisation, especially of the GIT
and airway, by pathogenic micro-organisms, has deleterious effects that may contribute to the potential to induce chronic inflammation in young children, which may only express itself in adult life.


Authors' affiliations

Robin John Green, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

Andre van Niekerk, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa; Nectare Clinton Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa

Ashley C Jeevarathnum, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

Charles Feldman, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Guy A Richards, on behalf of the South African Allergic Rhinitis Working Group, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

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Keywords

Microbiome; Chronic inflammatory airway disease

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2016;106(8):779-781. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2016.v106i8.11159

Article History

Date submitted: 2016-06-08
Date published: 2016-07-13

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