In Practice

CRISPR-Cas: Revolutionising genome engineering

Samantha Anne Nicholson, Michael Sean Pepper

Abstract


The ability to permanently alter or repair the human genome has been the subject of a number of science fiction films, but with the recent advent of several customisable sequence-specific endonuclease technologies, genome engineering looks set to become a clinical reality in the near future. This article discusses recent advancements in the technology called ‘clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated genes’ (CRISPR-Cas), the potential of CRISPR-Cas to revolutionise molecular medicine, and the ethical and regulatory hurdles facing its application.


Authors' affiliations

Samantha Anne Nicholson, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine, South African Medical Research Council Extramural Unit for Stem Cell Research and Therapy, and Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

Michael Sean Pepper, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine, South African Medical Research Council Extramural Unit for Stem Cell Research and Therapy, and Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

Full Text

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Keywords

Genome; Technology; Somatic; Germline; Research; Therapy

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2016;106(9):870-871. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2016.v106i9.11061

Article History

Date submitted: 2016-05-18
Date published: 2016-08-01

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